Window blinds are a popular and beautiful window treatment.

Blinds allow for better control over the amount of light and air that can be let in through the windows. You can have the blinds pull all the way down and still enjoy a good amount of light and air

Have a look at our Buyer's Guide to help you make a more informed choice.

Introduction

Window blinds are a type of window covering that allows you to control light coming in through the windows and visibility both inside and out.

A typical window blind is made up of several long horizontal (or vertical) slats of various types of hard material which are held together by cords that run through the blind slats and can be maneuvered using a variety of control systems. 

Types

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TypeDescriptionProsConsCost(Avg)Idea For
Indoor Roller blinds

Roller blinds are operated by a cord attached to the side and usually don’t have slats, instead featuring a single roll of material, like woven bamboo or fabric.

Room can be filled with maximum amount of light by lifting the roller blind. 

  • Easy to operate and low maintenance
  • Space-efficient way of covering windows
  • Child/Pet friendly solution
  • No light control/privacy control

S$7 psf

  • Master Bedroom: S$286
  • Common Bedroom: S$235
  • Living room: S$289
Quick Estimate
  • Bedrooms
  • Study room
  • Kitchens
  • Living room
Different Types
Shangri-La Blind Silhouette Roller Blind

Shangri la blinds consist of 2 different layers. A dim-out fabric with a special wave that links two layers of sheer materials together.

Upon drawing the entire blind down, it opens up at the end to reveal a see-thru mesh, therefore having both day and night blind functions in one blind.

  • Elegant and sophisticated appearance
  • Some light/privacy control
  • More cleaning effort (between layers) as compared to other options

S$9.9 psf

  • Living room: S$409
Quick Estimate
  • Living Room
  • Study Room
Combi Blind Rainbow Blind Korean Blind

These blind type combine alternate panels of opaque and sheer fabrics into two layers of fabrics, rolled up into one big piece of blind.

As you pull the blinds up and down, these panels will glide over each other seamlessly.

This allows flexible control of the amount of light and privacy level in a room.

  • Easy to operate and low maintenance
  • Child/Animal friendly solution
  • Good control of light/privacy
  • More cleaning effort (in between the 2 layers) as compared to other options
  • Range of material design is lesser than indoor roller blinds

S$7 psf

  • Master Bedroom: S$286
  • Common Bedroom: S$235
  • Living room: S$289
Quick Estimate
  • Living Room
  • Study Room
  • Bed Room
  • Kitchen
Vertical Blind

Vertical blinds have large vertical slats that reach from the floor to the top of the window.

The slats can be tilted like horizontal slat blinds, and can be pulled back to uncover the window.

  • Possible to replace individual column instead of whole system
  • Can accommodate for large windows
  • Bottom end gets dirty easily
  • When opening blinds, vertical columns collide in the swinging motion causing noise.
  • Gaps between blind and wall might allow others to peep inside

S$5.4 psf

  • Master Bedroom: S$220
  • Common Bedroom: S$181
  • Living room: S$223
Quick Estimate
  • Living Room
  • Study Room
Venetian Blind Persian Blind Slat Blind

The blind features horizontal rows of slats that can be tilted at angles to let in more light.

The entire body of the blind can be lifted up as well.

  • Uniform look for both inside and outside
  • Elegant and sophisticated appearance
  • Price on higher side
  • Dust tends to collect easily on horizontal slats
  • Subjectible to blind warping if slats are of materials with high plastic content (e.g. PVC)
  • Wooden Venetian blinds are very heavy to raise

S$5.2 psf

  • Master Bedroom: S$212
  • Common Bedroom: S$174
  • Living room: S$215
Quick Estimate
  • Living Room
  • Study Room
  • Bed Room
  • Kitchen
Roman Blind

Roman blinds are produced from one piece of fabric without pleats for a smooth, stylish look when opened or closed.

They are designed to fold up into neat pleats when raised.

  • Timeless style
  • No Light control/privacy control
  • Cords used can be a child/pet hazard
  • Moisture and food scent can easily get trapped in the fabric leading to mould and stench

S$12 psf

  • Master Bedroom: S$490
  • Common Bedroom: S$402
  • Living room: S$496
Quick Estimate
  • Living Room
  • Study Room
  • Bed Room
Unislat Blind

Similar to vertical blinds, Unislat blind consists of washable individual slats that reach from the floor to the top of the window.

The slats can be tilted like horizontal slat blinds, and can be pulled back to uncover the window.

Individual pieces of slats allow wind (or person) to pass through even when it is drawn close.

  • Allows air circulation even when closed
  • Must be hand washed (each slat is attached to a plastic hanger)

S$8.9 psf

  • Living room: S$368
Quick Estimate
  • Living Room

Buying Considerations

  • Functional use - besides aesthetics, choosing a blind type would also depend on the intended usage. It is important to discuss with the vendor on your needs and explore which blind type and materials will help you need them:
    • If it's to darken a room,  it would be better to consider a blind design where there are no visible openings for light to shine through. For example, Venetian blinds have slats which would have openings in between them allowing some light to pass. Roller blinds on the other hand consist of a full length of continuous fabric with no visible openings. The additional consideration would then be on how much light can pass through the blind’s fabric material.
    • If you’re looking to control glare inside a room and maintaining privacy, then blinds with adjustable slats (e.g. Venetian blinds or Combi blinds) or having a dual sheer material would help to control the amount of light passing through. Balance between privacy and maintaining view through windows would be an individual’s preference and chosen blind design should allow one to control that.
  • Openness of Fabric - Different blind material will filter out different amount of light. Openness of a fabric controls the amount of light that is allowed through the fabric. Higher the openness, the more light is allowed. If you have access to a sample blind, an easy way to test this is to use your mobile's torch light function. Turn it on and point it behind the blind and observe how much light gets passed through, slowly move your mobile away from the blind to check how the blind will react to varying amount of light.
  • Sun damage - Whilst it’s unlikely that your blinds will fade due to sun exposure, there is a risk that they may turn yellow over time – particularly if they are white. This is most often a problem with cheaper blinds made from poor quality materials and without proper UV resistance.
  • Consider exterior view - Oftentimes, we’re focused on achieving the perfect indoor look, but we should also balance the exterior feel as well. It is thus important to also have a look from different perspectives (e.g. looking from outside through the window). If you get a blind material that is translucent or with perforations, make sure to check how much can be seen from the outside (especially at night conditions and room is brightly lighted) and if it addresses your privacy concerns.
  • Window size - There are dimension limitations for any blinds that you choose. If you have large windows, it is important to discuss with a vendor how the blinds would look after installation. In situations like this, explore various options till it meets your requirement if not shop around to find one that does. There are some options that you can discuss with the vendor:
    • Install multiple individual smaller panels to cover the entire window.  Speak with the vendor to clarify how the different panels would align, and if there's any gaps in between them. If the intended usage is to make sure no light passes through, or have absolute privacy, then it's crucial to make sure no gaps exist between the panels.
    • Rotating or extending the fabric. If the fabric and blind system allows it, the fabric can be turned 90º (railroaded) from the way it comes off the fabric roll to meet the width of the window and if the height requires it, this panel may then be attached to another fabric panel with a seam.
  • Bottom Bar design - some blind types (e.g. roller blinds) would have various options of bottom bar design that will help to match overall aesthetics of the blind. Make the design of the bottom bar is considered before agreeing on a design or blind type. No point selecting a design and after installation find it an eye-sore.
  • Maintainability - Installation is just the start, ease of maintenance would be the difference in wanting to keep the blind or change to another type. It's important to get a good understanding of how easy it is to clean/maintain them. Questions like below would help you to get this clarified:
    • Is it made out of machine-washable fabric?
    • Does it have any dust mite resistant features?
    • Does it have any mold resistant resistant features?
    • How easy is it to clean it?
    • Is it prone to sun damage? If not, why? And how?
  • Control System - There are different pulley systems for controlling blinds and depending on who’ll be using the blind, it is important to understand how they work.
    • Standard Pull Cord - Most common lift you will see on blinds. It features a sturdy cord that hangs straight along the side. Standard cords can be paired with almost any type of blind or shade and are typically the most affordable option.
    • Continuous loop cord - This operates like a pulley system with either a cord or a beaded chain placed on either side of the blind. Pulling the loop in one direction lifts the blind and in the opposite direction to lower it. This provides a neater look because the cord is a fixed length and the tensioning device is adhered to the window frame or floor, eliminating dangling cords.
    • Cordless - They work on an adjustable tension system with multiple spool drums that raise and lower the blinds without the need for any exposed cords.
    • Motorised Lift - These are blinds attached with electric motors that are controlled via an electronic operating system. They can be remotely operated and with touch of a button, blinds can be raised or lowered.
  • Generated noise - Often a point that is overlooked is on how much additional noise is generated if a certain blind type is installed into a room. If a vertical blind is installed in a windy room (e.g. with a standing fan), the bottom bar might swing violently (due to air circulation) and clanking of the bar with the wall or window grill would produce noise that might be unbearable. Or if a pulley system is not well designed, it would be very loud when raising/lowering the blind. Lastly, placement of the cord is also something to consider. If the cord tensioner is located too near a wall or window grill, clanking of the tensioner might be quite loud as well.
  • Health concerns -  Chemical coats are used to make blind materials last longer, do ask about the material's composition to ensure its safe for you and your family. Especially if there are young children or people with sensitive skin around. Certain fabric would easily trap dust at its surface and if you’ve young children with asthma, then it is important to not consider such type of fabric.
  • Warranty Period and type - if all goes well, this usually is out of a consumer's mind but it is very important to have ease of mind and understand what is covered if an issue occurs. Blinds and fabrics oftentimes are covered separately and is also important to clarify if warranty allows for full onsite support or partial (i.e. transport cost needs to be beared by the consumer).

Specific considerations for:

FAQ

Technical Terms

  1. Ladders - The two outside strings that hold a horizontal blind together. The ladder is attached at the headrail, runs through the middle of the slats, and finishes at the bottom rail. These can often be covered with tapes.
  2. Tapes - Most horizontal blinds can be ordered with optional cloth tapes. These cloth tapes hold and tilt the slats and overlap the ladder and come in various colors and patterns.
  3. Slats - Slats run horizontally or vertically between the ladders. The slats block the light and can be tilted either by pull cords or a wand.
  4. Routing Holes - The center hole where the lift cord goes through the slats. Ladder is punched through a routing hole on each slat and allows your blinds to rotate and lift in unison.
  5. Head Rails/Pelmets - The uppermost part of your blind, it's where the control mechanism is located and where the blind attaches to the wall or ceiling.
  6. Bottom Bar/Bottom Rail - The bottom most piece of a horizontal blind. These are weighted to make sure the blinds hang straight. If your blinds have hold down brackets, the brackets are attached to the bottom rail.
  7. Cord - Part of the control system of a blind, cord is a long slender length of flexible material used to control the position of the blind slats.
  8. Beaded Cord/Beaded chain -  Cord made of small spheres connected by a slender length of flexible material. This type of chain is usually comprised of a continuous nylon cord with thermally fused plastic beads along its length. The spacing of the beads on a plastic beaded chain are typically twice that of a metal beaded chain and this is done for flexibility.
  9. Standard Pull Cord - The standard pull cord is the most common lift you will see on blinds.  The standard pull features a sturdy cord that hangs straight along the side. They can be located on either of the blind.
  10. Continuous Cord Loop - The Continuous Cord Loop operates like a pulley system with either a cord or a beaded chain and can be placed on either side of the blind. Pulling the loop in one direction lifts the blind and in the opposite direction to lower it.
  11. Motorised Lift - These are blinds attached with electric motors that are controlled via an electronic operating system. With the touch of a button, blinds can be raised or lowered.
  12. Cordless - They work on an adjustable tension system with multiple spool drums that raise and lower the blinds without the need for any exposed cords. To operate a cordless system, simply grasp the middle of the bottom rail and pull up or down with a gentle, even pressure. The blinds will stay wherever you place them. Almost any type of blind can be paired with cordless controls.
  13. Cord Tensioner - The cord tensioner holds looped cords taut.
  14. Cord Lock - Located on or inside the headrail, a cord lock lets you lock your blind in the desired position. When the cord is pulled straight down, the blind rises and locks into place when you stop pulling the cord. The cord unlocks by pulling toward the side and allowing gravity to lower the blind.
  15. Extension Bracket - Extension brackets are used with blinds that are mounted on the outside of the window casing to allow clearance to accommodate any obstacles such as wood trim or handles that open and close windows. There is no additional charge for extension brackets.
  16. Hold Down Brackets - Brackets that attach to the bottom rail of the blind and hold the blind in place. These are recommended if your blind is being hung on a moving surface, such as a door or a window that has wind exposure.
  17. Tilt Wand - Part of the control system of a blind system, a tilt wand is a long slender length of inflexible material used to control angle of tilt of the blind slats. This allows one to control the  degree of privacy, and amount of sunlight to enter. Rotating this opens or closes the slats of your blind.
  18. Tilt Cord - Part of the control system of a blind system, a tilt cord  is a long slender length of flexible material used to control angle of tilt of the blind slats. With a simple pull of the tilt cord, your blinds open or close based on the amount of cord length pulled.Usually consisting of two cords, pulling one tilts the slats open while pulling the other tilts the slats closed. There is also an option of having a continuous loop option instead of having two cords, but function wise is the same.
  19. Blind warping - Exposure to heat may ultimately cause these blinds to warp(become bent or twisted out of shape), as composite wood or plastic is not specifically resistant to hotter temperatures.
  20. Sheer - Sheer fabric is fabric which is made using thin thread which results in a semi-transparent cloth.
  21. Pleats - A basic pleat is when the fabric is folded back on itself, thereby creating an accordion-like appearance.